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  • #THECATKITCHEN RECIPES: VEGAN GYOZAS


    My neighbourhood wet market sells organic beetroots.
    Hence, I try to juice beetroot regularly.
    It’s something I’ve kept to since turning vegan five years ago.
    After juicing, we get this fine, grated texture of beetroot.
    I usually juice beetroot with carrots, ginger and granny smiths.
    I hate to waste anything, especially the good stuffs.
    Along the way, i’ve learnt to use the pulp for a variety of recipes.
    Cookies, breads, granolas, soups, salads, and gyozas…
    Yes. GYOZAS.

    When it comes to gyozas, I’m the Queen.
    I’ve always been a fan of gyozas and sure can live on gyozas only!
    Sadly, I never found convincing vegetarian or pescatarian versions, let alone vegan ones.
    Most gyozas are made with minced pork.
    While the vegetarian ones are made with chopped shitakes, carrots and celery.
    YUCKS, I HATE CELERY. I would literally convulse when I taste celery.
    Honestly, I do find most vegetarian dumplings too chunky and less digestible.
    They lack that fine juicy minced pork texture.
    Often, vegetarians or vegans are considered second class citizens at most restaurants.
    Which explains why world famous vegan gyozas don't exactly exist in our world. 
    So by accident, I created my own version of vegan gyozas with whatever I had in the fridge.
    A pack of dumpling skins and beetroot pulp mixed with ginger. 
    I staunchly get the skins from Meidi-ya supermarket, the brand is called Ryushobo. 
    Of course, you should always make your own dumplings skins if you can.
    Coincidentally, I ran out of cilantro and replaced them with chopped basil which are always
    readily available from my massive herb pot.
    And I thought basil and beetroot made for a killer combination!
    The earthiness of the beetroot and freshness from the basil along with the distinct tart taste
    of a vinegar dip make these truly original vegan gyozas.
    Halfway eating them and realizing the similarities of how the ingredients tasted like
    a roasted beetroot with balsamico, garnished with basil leaves... 
    Anyhow, it was a strangely detoxifying dish, have a go at it and tell me what you think! X

    #THECATKITCHENRECIPES: VEGAN GYOZAS
    Serves 4 as a side dish
    INGREDIENTS

    FOR THE FILLINGS

    • 3 cups fine beetroot pulp
    • ¼ cup fine ginger pulp
    • 3 tbs non gmo organic toasted sesame oil
    • ½ tsp white pepper
    • ½ tsp pink himalayan salt


    FOR THE DUMPLINGS

    • ¼ cup chopped basil leaves
    • 15 to 20 round dumpling wrappers
    • brown rice vinegar for dipping
    • ¼ cup of sake
    • ½  cup of water
    • 1 tbs first cold-pressed olive oi

    METHOD

    1. Add beetroot, ginger, sesame oil, pepper, salt in a bowl and mix well. 
    2. Spoon up to a full teaspoon of filling into each dumpling wrapper. 
    3. Use your fingers to dab a bit of water around the edges of each wrapper. Fold the wrappers in half, over the filling, and pinch the edges and create pleats starting from one end to the other.
    4. Prepare a large skillet and heat up the olive oil.
    5. Start assembling the gyozas into a circle, wings [pleated side] up. Once they turn golden brown on the bottom, add sake and water. Cover with a lid immediately and steam for 3-5 mins.
    6. Serve with vinegar for dipping and garnish with chopped basil.

    NOTES
    Make extra filling and keep them in a sealed container, they can last a few days for more gyozas! 
    Add white fish or shrimps to them if you love a bit of seafood.

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  • Comments on this post (2 comments)

    • Walter says...

      Thanks for the list. I’m vegan and I love your site. The sweet and sour eggplant is one of my fav reipces. And I’ve found it easy to adapt a lot of your reipces. I make shakshuka without eggs and just throw in some chickpeas. It’s delicious.

      On April 07, 2015

    • Amey says...

      The entire flimay went vegan last May. After we watched Forks over Knives how could we not. We had shifted to all organic and non GMO a year earlier. It for health reasons but it sure helps keeping a kosher kitchen and I don’t have to worry about timing either. Now, what to do with all these blue and red items? lol

      On April 03, 2015

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